Qualcomm rejects Broadcom's initial $105 billion takeover offer

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Broadcoms offer was for $70 a share – valuing Qualcomm at just north of $100 billion dollars (the deal would include $25 billion of debt). Another tactic Broadcom could use is to nominate directors for Qualcomm's board ahead of the company's annual general meeting in 2018.

Hawk Tan, the Chief Executive at Broadcom, said in an announcement that this integral exchange will put the joined undertaking as a pioneer in the worldwide correspondence advertises with an incredible arrangement of items and advancements.

"No company is better positioned in mobile, IoT (internet of things) automotive, edge computing and networking within the semiconductor industry", Mollenkopf said, in Qualcomm's statement.

"We are highly confident that the strategy Steve and his team are executing on provides far superior value to Qualcomm shareholders than the proposed offer", said Tom Horton, Presiding Director for Qualcomm.

On the other hand, Hock Tan, Broadcom CEO who said earlier this month he would revive his company's presence in the United States from Singapore, said he is open to initiating a takeover battle. Analysts have said a deal between the two would help Qualcomm settle its legal battle with the iPhone maker as Broadcom has a closer relationship with Apple.

Both semiconductor companies did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Qualcomm is already at the front of the pack when it comes to mobile chipmaking, and it stands to make a lot of money from that position as carriers begin to roll out 5G networks. Now we'll have to see if Broadcom returns with a bigger offer (though its initial proposal represented a 28% premium over Qualcomm's share price before Broadcom's plans were reported in the press) or simply gives up.

Broadcom made an unsolicited bid last week to buy Qualcomm in an effort to become the dominant supplier of chips used in the 1.5 billion or so smartphones expected to be sold around the world this year.

Finally, it seems the board was concerned about a fight with regulators, even though Broadcom was willing to make some concessions to appease them.

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