Launch of Idaho's first satellite postponed

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A United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket carrying the Joint Polar Satellite System 1 weather satellite stands atop its launchpad at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California after a rocket issue prevented a planned liftoff on November 14, 2017. Sensors aboard the spacecraft will collect measurements of air, ocean, and ground conditions, as well as fire locations, temperatures and water vapor throughout the atmosphere.

The spacecraft was built by Ball Aerospace and involves a collaboration between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

"I always love watching these things", said Goff.

Several instruments aboard the satellite will provide detailed observations of temperature, air moisture, ice, snow, fog, wildfires, precipitation and ozone around the world. The data can be used to better predict weather events and hazards, such as a hurricane's track and a hurricane's intensity. NOAA funds and manages the program, operations and data products.

The mission is scheduled to begin at 4:47 a.m. EST (1:47 a.m. PST), Nov. 10, 2017, with JPSS-1 atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta II rocket lifting off from Space Launch Complex 2 (SLC-2) at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The launch of the first of NOAA's planned four Joint Polar Satellite System, or JPSS-1, was scrubbed early this morning due to a combination of wayward boats that had crossed into restricted space as well as a couple of positions that reported technical "no go" s during the countdown and system checks.

"The launch of JPSS-1 continues the strong, decades-long partnership between NOAA and NASA in developing state-of-the-art Earth observation satellites", said Sandra Smalley, director of NASA's Joint Agency Satellite Division.

A United Launch Alliance live tweet said that the Delta II rocket had just a 66-second window to launch JPSS-1 into the correct orbit.

Polar satellites like the JPSS-1, which orbit the globe from pole-to-pole 14 times a day, are considered the backbone of the global observing system. Instruments on board were designed by Ball, along with Raytheon, Harris and Northrop Grumman.

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