Facebook wants your nudes to combat revenge porn

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Facebook is testing a very unorthodox way to stop others from uploading naked pictures of you to their social media platform.

"Yes, they're not storing a copy, but the image is still being transmitted and processed".

Facebook is asking users to send them their nude photos in an effort to tackle revenge porn.

Software being used by Facebook will take the images and create a hash - a digital fingerprint which looks like a series of letters and numbers - which it will recognise if it is uploaded again and automatically block it.

It's definitely worth thinking about how to hack proof your life but the good news is that Facebook are finally climbing onboard, too.

Australia's e-safety commissioner Julia Inman Grant told ABC, 'We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly'.

Editors' Note: Adult Australians concerned that an intimate image may be shared online can complete an online form on the eSafety Commissioner's official website detailing their concerns.

A spokesperson states in order for a photo to qualify as revenge porn an employee of Facebook must view the image first for themselves. Facebook, in their April announcement of the program, called the employees "specially trained representatives from our Community Operations team".

"They're not storing the image, they're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies", she said.

"This pilot has the potential to disable the control and power perpetrators hold over victims, particularly in cases of ex-partner retribution and sextortion, and the subsequent harm that could come to them", said Inman Grant.

If the anti-revenge porn trial is successful, the program will reportedly move to the U.S., Canada and Great Britain in the future.

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