"Blade Runner 2049" is a modern day science-fiction masterpiece

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There are multiple versions of the original Blade Runner and director Ridley Scott believes that the version released in 2007 is the closest to his original dream. As the title suggests, it's been 30 years since the events of the original film, and Deckard, a former Blade Runner, a law enforcement hunter of replicants, has vanished. Blade Runner scribe Hampton Fancher and Michael Green (Logan) penned the screenplay. "It's a piece of art that's at flawless equilibrium, aesthetically and musically".

"That's so cool that you did that", Gosling says. A big fan of the original - he is said to have received the blessing of Scott, who is counted among the film's producers - the director is meticulous and purposeful in executing his vision.

"Blade Runner 2049", the long-awaited sequel to the 1982 cult classic, has finally arrived. A few rogue early models are still out there, and LAPD "blade runners" still take on the job of tracking them down and "retiring" them; one of those officers, himself a later-model replicant, is "K" (Ryan Gosling).

Yet, "Blade Runner 2049" fits in the established universe near seamlessly. When she admitted that she'd never actually seen the film, all three of them burst out laughing and basically never stopped. Gosling calls upon his deep reserve of offhand charisma and quiet cool, and pulls it off. Ford (who appears much later than you're probably expecting) is wildly effective, a haunted and tortured presence, full of cynical axioms like "Sometimes to love someone... you've got to be a stranger". But then the program was revisited by new owner Niander Wallace (Jared Leto) and upgraded.

Harrison Ford has a reputation on screen-especially in his older years-for being rather grumpy.

"Johnnie Walker blending tradition dates back to 1820 and I'm honoured to carry on the legacy and collective memory of our other past blenders to ensure that the same whisky enjoyed today can be enjoyed responsibly in 2049".

They each share a story about working with Roger Deakins? The movie's visual palette is so striking that I was nearly disappointed when Villeneuve would cut away from a long, slow plan through the dystopian streets of Los Angeles to get back to the narrative. As to which of the eight versions (!) you should revisit - they being the Workprint, the U.S. Theatrical Cut, San Diego Sneak Preview Cut, the International Cut, the U.S. Broadcast Cut, the Director's Cut and the Final Cut - is entirely up to you (we probably recommend the latter), but do go back to maximise your experience of "2049".

We don't know if Villeneuve is being cagey simply because he doesn't know anything, or because he has some involvement with 007 that prevents him from speaking about it.

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