Pres. Trump Meets With Sen. Scott on Race Relations

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It's been almost a month since Donald Trump, after weathering three days of relentless criticism for his failure to condemn the murderous white supremacists waving tiki torches in Charlottesville, stamped angrily to a podium and characterized those murderous white supremacists as "very fine people", pointing out for good measure that the counterprotesters who showed up to condemn neo-Nazis hadn't obtained a city permit to do so.

"No. 2, I think it's great for [Democrats and Republicans] to be able to make a moral call that white supremacy's not acceptable, and I want the president to have to sign it", Kaine said.

Following the meeting, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said it was "very productive".

Mary Elizabeth Taylor, the White House deputy director of legislative affairs for nominations, who is black, was also at the meeting, though the issue of nominations was not on the agenda.

House Democrats responded by introducing a resolution to censure Trump, and many supported the move. Tim Scott met with Trump in the Oval Office to deliver a "pointed lecture" to the president about racism and his disturbing response to the Charlotteville terrorism last month. Tim Scott's been a friend of mine for a long time. Scott, the only African-American GOP senator, discussed race relations with Trump following the president's "sterile" response to the deadly riots in Charlottesville, Virginia last month.

"We discussed everything from legislative remedies for those living in poverty, to the incident in Charlottesville, to some of the other issues that are important - diversifying staff (at the White House)", the SC senator told USA TODAY about the roughly 45-minute meeting.

She adds, "If a stylist dressed the president, they should be fired".

Trump "was ever-present during the entire meeting", he said. Trump said he would seriously consider it.

When a reporter asked the senator if the president had expressed regret, a pained look flashed on Mr. Scott's face.

Scott said of the conversation, 'We discussed everything from legislative remedies for those living in poverty, to the incident in Charlottesville, to some of the other issues that are important - diversifying staff'. However, the president later returned to his highly criticized initial response. Trump's handling of the situation earned him an avalanche of criticism, including from many leaders of his own party.

But these are not ordinary times, which is why we take note of a measure passed by both the Senate and House this week that rejects hate groups such as neo-Nazis and the Ku Klux Klan and, remarkably, specifically calls on President Trump to condemn them, too.

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