House repeal of 'Obamacare' hands hot potato to wary Senate

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"Hey, I am president, do you believe it, right?" he asked the lawmakers. "We're going to draft our own bill". The Kentucky Republican has included himself in the mixture of committee chairmen, conservatives and party leaders.

"I don't have room to cut; that's the problem with the per cap", McAuliffe said. Ryan argued that "we would spell disaster for ourselves, politically ... if we go back on our word".

He suggested changing the rules to allow a 51 percent threshold for passing legislation or electing more Republicans in 2018.

"This Republican health care bill needs to either be flushed down the toilet or thrown in the garbage".

Priebus also downplayed concerned about the House bill's implications for individuals with preexisting conditions.

"We think we need to do even more support for people who are older and also more support for people with pre-existing conditions", Ryan acknowledged.

A picture of Rep. Mimi Walters, R-Calif., taking a selfie at Trump's Thursday Rose Garden celebration to cheer House passage of the bill quickly made its way into a fundraising appeal from one of her Democratic challengers, Kia Hamadanchy - with the subject line, "I am appalled".

The campaign will run in congressional districts in 15 states.

The new USA healthcare bill is "a great plan", according to President Donald Trump.

On Wednesday, he told reporters they would support the legislation with an $8 billion amendment added over five years to assist those with pre-existing conditions in states that seek waivers under the Republican health care plan as now proposed.

Undoing Obama's law has been a goal for Republican lawmakers since it was adopted in 2011 and was a top campaign promise of President Donald Trump. Lamoureux said that if the Senate signs the bill into law, those that lose Medicaid coverage will no longer be able to afford healthcare and will turn to free and charitable clinics as a result.

Polling shows that the public disagrees with Republican health-care plans.

Obama defended his signature achievement in Boston Sunday night while accepting the John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award. The group told Business Insider Friday that it had raised over $4 million on Thursday-including over $400,000 targeting Republicans who supported the AHCA. "But it does require some courage to champion the vulnerable, and the sick and the infirm".

"I'm going to read the House bill, find out what it costs and where I find good ideas there, why we'll borrow them".

"Republican Senators will not let the American people down!" "ObamaCare premiums and deductibles are way up-it was a lie and it is dead!"

"This bill would make it tougher and more expensive for people - including those with pre-existing conditions - to get coverage, harder to access opioid and heroin treatment programs, and raise premiums on older Americans."
Martha McSally, begin by touting opposition to the bill from the American Medical Association, AARP and the American Cancer Society. Some Senate Republicans, including Rob Portman of Ohio, Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia, Cory Gardner of Colorado and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, object to cutting $880 billion from Medicaid.

The ACA expanded Medicaid with extra payments to 31 states to cover more people.

The GOP bill would also limit federal spending on Medicaid.

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