ICE: Immigration raids not carried out in Plant City

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The raids, targeting illegal immigrants with additional felonies, are part of the first large-scale enforcement operation since President Donald Trump took office.

According to ICE, 95 people were arrested in Los Angeles County, 35 in Orange County, 13 in San Bernardino County, seven in Riverside County, six in Ventura County and five in Santa Barbara County.

However, there are apparently undocumented immigrants with no criminal records were also arrested and could possibly be deported.

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly commended U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers Monday for conducting enforcement operations last week that resulted in more than 680 arrests.

During a targeted enforcement operation conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement aimed at immigration fugitives, re-entrants and at-large criminal aliens, 28 foreign nationals were arrested in the past week in Austin. Other agents arrested 40 people in the New York City area, according to an ICE fact sheet.

After being sworn in, Trump took several controversial steps against immigration by ordering a wall on the border with Mexico and authorizing a crackdown on USA cities that shield illegal immigrants.

Among them 161 arrests were made in Los Angeles and some 200 in Atlanta, said local media reports.

The people targeted had criminal convictions and, in that sense, the raids were no different from operations conducted under previous administrations, the ICE statement said. "The majority of them were felons and those felons which had prior convictions included sex offenses, domestic violence, assault, robbery and weapons violations, just to name a few", said Marin in a press teleconference held late Friday. In one case, the ICE agency charged one immigrant as a "gang member" because of old speeding tickets and tattoos. While insisting the focus remained on those with criminal convictions, or foreigners who posed national security threats, the Obama administration routinely rounded up and deported what the Times termed "low-priority immigrants". "And that is what I said I would do".

"The rash of these recent reports about ICE checkpoints and random sweeps and the like, it's all false, and that's definitely unsafe and irresponsible", he said.

"Many of our members don't have papers", said Martinez, who leads the children's ministry at the church pastored by the Rev. Rufino Osorio. For example, it not only prioritizes the deportation of convicted criminals but people whose charges have not been adjudicated and others who "have committed acts that constitute a chargeable criminal offense".

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